Charlotte, NC, USA

SimplySoulSistas was created by a woman who fights her own mental health battle daily. That's right, I, Imani Blaize battle my own mental health issues. As a scholar and advocate for mental health, I can serve as a tool to help you. You are NOT alone. Read below about some of the most common mental health issues that we tend to deal with as minority women and if you feel like you don't know where to start to get help. I'm right here. 

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Anxiety

Described as:

 

Usually self-diagnosable

Symptoms include stress that's out of proportion to the impact of the event, inability to set aside a worry, and restlessness.

People may experience:

Whole body: fatigue, restlessness, or sweating

Cognitive: lack of concentration, racing thoughts, or unwanted thoughts

Behavioral: hypervigilance or irritability

Also common: butterflies, excessive worry, fear, feeling of impending doom, insomnia, nausea, palpitations, or trembling

Depression

Described as:

 

The persistent feeling of sadness or loss of interest that characterizes major depression can lead to a range of behavioral and physical symptoms. These may include changes in sleep, appetite, energy level, concentration, daily behavior, or self-esteem. Depression can also be associated with thoughts of suicide.

 

People may experience changes in :

Mood: anxiety, apathy, general discontent, guilt, hopelessness, loss of interest, loss of interest or pleasure in activities, mood swings, or sadness

 

Sleep: early awakening, excess

sleepiness, insomnia, or restless sleep

 

Whole body: excessive hunger, fatigue, loss of appetite, or restlessness

 

Behavioral: agitation, excessive crying, irritability, or social isolation

 

Cognitive: lack of concentration, slowness in activity, or thoughts of suicide

 

Weight: weight gain or weight loss

Also common: poor appetite or repeatedly going over thoughts

Bi Polar Disorder

 

Described as:

Very common

 

More than 3 million US cases per year

 

Chronic: can last for years or be lifelong

Requires a medical diagnosis

Lab tests or imaging not required

The exact cause of bipolar disorder isn’t known, but a combination of genetics, environment, and altered brain structure and chemistry may play a role.

People may experience changes in : 

Manic episodes may include symptoms such as high energy, reduced need for sleep, and loss of touch with reality. Depressive episodes may include symptoms such as low energy, low motivation, and loss of interest in daily activities. Mood episodes last days to months at a time and may also be associated with suicidal thoughts.

Treatment is usually lifelong and often involves a combination of medications and psychotherapy.

Post Traumatic Stress Disorder 

Described as: 

 

A disorder in which a person has difficulty recovering after experiencing or witnessing a terrifying event.

Very common

More than 3 million US cases per year

Treatable by a medical professional

Requires a medical diagnosis

Lab tests or imaging not required

The condition may last months or years, with triggers that can bring back memories of the trauma accompanied by intense emotional and physical reactions.

People may experience:

Symptoms may include nightmares or unwanted memories of the trauma, avoidance of situations that bring back memories of the trauma, heightened reactions, anxiety, or depressed mood.

Treatment includes different types of trauma-focused psychotherapy as well as medications to manage symptoms.